JASK 

Japan/America Society of Kentucky

1987-2018


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Japan/America Society of Kentucky
464 Chenault Rd.
Frankfort, KY 40601
(502) 209-9630
programs@jask.org

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Keiko Fukuzaki Prepares to Leave Kentucky

01 Jun 2010 1:37 PM | Deleted user
By: Keiko Fukuzaki, JASK Volunteer
University of Kentucky, Asia Center

-- Keiko has been working in Kentucky as a Japanese-culture educational outreach coordinator through a grant from the Center for Global Partnership. --

My two year long program in Kentucky is almost over. There are only two months left before I go back to Japan. Thanks to JASK and the UK Asia Center’s support, I have been able to provide various programs around Kentucky. My main focus has been school visits. I have spent 92 days doing school visits and have met about 11,000 students.

When I first came here, I didn’t know much about Japanese traditional culture. So I covered only basic themes about Japan, such as ’Japanese elementary school student-life’, origami, and calligraphy. But people are very interested in Japanese traditional culture and its heart, and they often asked me about it.  At first I couldn’t answer very well. I learned that I needed to know more about Japanese traditional culture. As I prepared for presentations on Japan, I found the uniqueness of Japanese culture. Once I got involved with the Japanese groups in the area, I found great Sensei (teachers) and Nakama (friends) to study with.

When I did Tea Ceremony demonstrations or presented about Noh theatre, students watched closely, concentrated on what was going on and what I was saying. Before I came here and studied more, I had not realized that Japanese culture is so deep and interwoven with religion and customs. I also didn’t realize until I came here how valuable Japanese Culture was to all people, not only the Japanese. There are so many things to learn from traditional culture. You can learn how to communicate with others, how to show respect to people, how to show appreciation to nature, art, and even everyday objects that you use. You can find friends who share the same ideas as you do easily. That’s why I’m enjoying learning and spreading them to many people.

I’ve also learned about Kentucky’s wonderful culture, and what kind of image they have of Japan, the American education system, and more. I love the people of Kentucky! They are very nice, friendly and are very hospitable. I really appreciate that I have been blessed with this role. I feel like I have been educated by the people of Kentucky even more than I have taught them.

 After my program is over, I would like to continue to learn about other cultures and tell Japanese people about my great experiences in Kentucky.

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